NASA and petroleum industry to share Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory
The NBL uses a deep pool to train astronauts for space shuttle and International Space Station missions.
November 15th, 2011
12:13 PM ET

NASA and petroleum industry to share Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

A facility that trains astronauts for space will soon train oil and gas workers for water safety.

On Tuesday, NASA announced that Raytheon Technical Services Co., which runs the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory, or NBL, will partner with Petrofac Training Services to offer the training.

The NBL, at Johnson Space Center, outside Houston, is a facility centered on a deep pool used to train astronauts for space shuttle and International Space Station missions. The agreement makes use of the excess training capacity at the NBL since the end of the space shuttle program.

Petrofac will initially use the facility to train offshore oil and gas workers in classes on escaping from a helicopter that is underwater, basic offshore safety and offshore emergency techniques.

The NBL's pool, at 202 feet long, 102 feet wide and 40 feet deep, provides a realistic environment for underwater survival training for oil and gas workers. Training is expected to begin in December.

Astronauts training for missions to the International Space Station will also continue their training in the NBL.

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Filed under: News • On Earth
soundoff (4 Responses)
  1. more heaven

    Hello there, You've done a fantastic job. I'll certainly digg it and personally recommend to my friends. I am confident they will be benefited from this site.

    November 27, 2012 at 8:20 pm |
  2. patrick

    Aw man. My BOSIET is not up for another couple of years. I would have much rather gone to NASA for that as opposed to southern Louisiana.

    November 22, 2011 at 10:51 am |
  3. Space....the eternal journey

    Bravo! It's refreshing to see that NASA's think tank is still clicking away on all cylinders, even shifting gears. I've had some thoughts about the future of NASA due to the recent changes in the space program. This can only make them more viable in a struggling economy. Excellent cooperative use of existing facility. Other industries should follow their lead and develop innovative ways to cut the high costs of operating in today's world.

    November 15, 2011 at 10:44 pm |

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