NASA to launch powerful telescope array
NuSTAR will have 10 times the resolution and 100 times the sensitivity of similar telescopes.
May 30th, 2012
03:32 PM ET

NASA to launch powerful telescope array

A mission 20 years in the making is about to culminate with the launch of a one-of-a-kind satellite.

NASA announced today that its NuSTAR telescope could be shot into orbit as early as June 13.

NuSTAR, short for Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, will be able to create images of high energy X-rays, making it capable of studying cosmic phenomena such as black holes and how exploding stars form the elements that make up our universe. The new telescope will have 10 times the resolution and 100 times the sensitivity of similar telescopes.

NuSTAR will undergo a flight readiness review on June 1, if it passes that it will be strapped to an aircraft for transport to a launch pad on Kwajalein Atoll in the central Pacific Ocean. If everything goes according to plan, Orbital Sciences Corp. will shoot NuSTAR into space aboard one of its Pegasus XL rockets.

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Filed under: In Space
Dating the Milky Way's halo
The Milky Way glows bright through the center of this infrared image.
May 30th, 2012
01:42 PM ET

Dating the Milky Way's halo

We live in the Milky Way galaxy. Earth is located in one of the galaxy's spiral arms, affording those of us who live in darker parts of the world a view of a band of light snaking across the sky. That band of light is the subject of intense study, as astronomers try to answer questions about its origin and development.

Jason S. Kalirai, an assistant astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, has developed a new technique for measuring the age of stars in the Milky Way's halo. The halo is the spherical space around the flatter disk of the galaxy, which contains dense clusters of stars called globular clusters and older stars.

Kalirai's technique makes use of newly formed white dwarf stars to determine the age of their parent stars in the halo to within 0.7 billion years. This is much more precise than the two other techniques available to measure stellar ages in the halo, which are accurate to between 1 and 3 billion years, depending on the technique.

So why do we want to know how old stars in the Milky Way's halo are? The more precisely astronomers can determine those stars' ages, the more precisely they can determine the age of the galaxy itself, which in turn informs the theories of our galaxy's formation and evolution.

Read Kalirai's full study at Nature.com.

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Filed under: Discoveries • In Space
John Glenn Given Medal of Freedom
May 30th, 2012
12:24 PM ET

John Glenn Given Medal of Freedom

"President Barack Obama presents former United States Marine Corps pilot, astronaut and United States Senator John Glenn with a Medal of Freedom, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, during a ceremony at the White House in Washington."

Source: NASA

Filed under: Light up the screen

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