Want more kids to take calculus? Convince mom first
July 13th, 2012
03:51 PM ET

Want more kids to take calculus? Convince mom first

Math and science educators across the country spend their summers learning how to make calculus more engaging and biology more relevant, but there's a problem: What if high schoolers never even signed up for those classes?

What if a tough ninth grade algebra class meant they hopped off the high-tech train, and couldn't find a way back on later? What if nobody answered when kids asked, "But if I'm not going to be a chemist, why do I need this?"

For all the reasons teens find to stop taking math, science and technology classes, a study published online in the journal "Psychological Science" found a relatively simple way to make them continue: Convince their parents first.

FULL STORY from Schools of Thought

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Filed under: Math • On Earth • Science Education
July 13th, 2012
03:37 PM ET

Inside the Large Hadron Collider

Wouldn't it be awesome to look inside the Large Hadron Collider, where the Higgs boson may have been detected?

Check out this panoramic view of the Large Hadron Collider from Time.com.


Filed under: Large Hadron Collider • On Earth
Solar storm expected to hit Earth on Saturday
The aurora borealis is seen over the Midwest.
July 13th, 2012
02:50 PM ET

Solar storm expected to hit Earth on Saturday

The French could get a magnificent light show for Bastille Day this weekend thanks to a geomagnetic storm due to hit Earth on Saturday, a U.S. government scientist said.

The storm can generate auroras: waving, colorful lights that appear in the sky.

Joe Kunches, a space scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said the auroras may be seen along the U.S.-Canada border and in northern Europe on Saturday night. They are common farther north, like the Northern Lights, but magnetic storms like this one can make them appear in lower latitudes, he said.

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Filed under: In Space • the Sun
50th anniversary of satellite Telstar celebrated
A technician prepares to wire together the components of Telstar in July 1962.
July 13th, 2012
07:00 AM ET

50th anniversary of satellite Telstar celebrated

Cell phones, Internet, satellite television - they’re all technologies our society takes for granted. But about half a century ago, those types of communications were pure science fiction. Telstar, the world’s first global communications satellite, set us on a path to change that, and on Thursday the National Air and Space Museum marked the 50th anniversary of Telstar’s first television transmission.

Telstar’s July 1962 launch marked the birth of telecommunications, sending the first global transmission of a television signal. That first picture came from Andover Earth Station, Maine, to the Pleumeur-Bodou Telecom Center, Brittany, France. The satellite also handled telephone and fax signals.

Some of the first public video from the satellite included remarks from then-President John F. Kennedy, and a baseball game between the Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago Cubs.

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Filed under: News • On this Day

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