A second chance to wish upon a shooting star with Leonid meteor shower
A meteor from the Leonid meteor shower streaks across the sky.
November 19th, 2012
09:57 PM ET

A second chance to wish upon a shooting star with Leonid meteor shower

Maybe the wish you made on a shooting star during the Leonid meteor shower last week didn't come true. You could get a second chance Tuesday as forecasts expect to see a secondary peak in this year's shower.

NASA is predicting as many as five to 15 meteors per hour, sometime between 12:30 a.m. to 3 a.m. ET. The first peak happened early Saturday.

The Leonids occur in mid-November each year as the Earth passes through debris from the comet Tempel-Tuttle.

"For best meteor viewing, dress warmly and go to a location away from city lights. You want clear, dark skies. Lie flat on your back and look straight up, allowing your eyes 30 to 45 minutes to adjust to the dark. No special viewing equipment needed - just your eyes," NASA astronomer Bill Cooke said on the agency's website.

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Filed under: In Space
Super-Jupiter spotted 170 light years away
The planet shown in this illustration, Kappa Andromedae b, is a "super-Jupiter" object.
November 19th, 2012
06:16 PM ET

Super-Jupiter spotted 170 light years away

By Elizabeth Landau, CNN

Scientists have discovered what could be a massive planet outside our solar system, NASA said Monday.

Astronomers used infrared data from the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii to identify Kappa Andromedae b, a "super-Jupiter" object that appears to be nearly 13 times the mass of Jupiter.

The planet orbits a star called Kappa Andromedae. It's not entirely certain whether Kappa Andromedae b is a planet, however, NASA said. If it can generate energy by fusion, it would be considered a "brown dwarf" star.

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Filed under: In Space • News
Expedition 33 Lands
November 19th, 2012
03:40 PM ET

Expedition 33 Lands

"The Soyuz TMA-05M spacecraft is seen shortly after it landed with Expedition 33 Commander Sunita Williams of NASA and Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko in a remote area of Kazakhstan, on Nov. 19, 2012. Williams, Hoshide and Malenchenko returned from four months onboard the International Space Station."

Source: NASA

Filed under: Light up the screen

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