Triceratops trio unearthed in Wyoming
The bones being unearthed near Newcastle, Wyoming, may be among the most complete Triceratops skeletons yet found.
June 3rd, 2013
11:05 PM ET

Triceratops trio unearthed in Wyoming

By Matt Smith, CNN

There were three of them, one of them probably a child, and at least one met a gruesome end at the hands of a terrifying predator.

About 67 million years later, a Wyoming rancher led scientists to their remains. Now experts are digging out one of the most complete skeletons yet of a Triceratops, the three-horned, plant-eating dinosaur that was one of the last of the giant reptiles.

"There's only three other skeletons that will match the completeness of one of the specimens we're excavating right now," said paleontologist Peter Larson, president of the Black Hills Institute of Geological Research.

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New dinosaur is a primitive bird
May 30th, 2013
04:29 AM ET

New dinosaur is a primitive bird

A dinosaur from the Middle-Late Jurassic period, found in China, gives scientists new understandings of how birds evolved, according to a Wednesday report from the journal Nature.

The newly discovered species is called Aurornis xui. "Aurora" is Latin for "daybreak" or "dawn." Ornis is Greek for "bird." The last part of the name, xui, honors paleontologist Xu Xing.

The dinosaur lived about 150 million years ago, said Pascal Godefroit, lead author and researcher at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels.

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This dinosaur ate like a falcon, study says
An allosaurus dinosaur skeleton is displayed at Sotheby's auction house in Paris in 2010.
May 23rd, 2013
05:30 PM ET

This dinosaur ate like a falcon, study says

By Elizabeth Landau, CNN

A dinosaur species called allosaurus had neck muscles that allowed it to whip its head back and forth while attacking prey, a new study in the journal Palaeontologia Electronica suggests.

Researchers led by Ohio University paleontologist Eric Snively created a three-dimensional model of the dinosaur bones based on CT scans, and figured out what the muscles must have been like. They examined a specimen called Big Al, about 150 million years old.

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Oldest dinosaur embryos discovered
A color-filtered image of a dinosaur embryo fossil shows a preserved thigh bone. The honeycomb-like structure is bone tissue.
April 10th, 2013
02:50 PM ET

Oldest dinosaur embryos discovered

By Azadeh Ansari, CNN

Everyone knows dinosaurs were gigantic, but they grew from tiny embryos just like birds do. What were these extinct reptiles like at this early stage of development?

Scientists have found some new clues that could shed light on this age-old mystery.

In a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature, scientists said they have discovered the oldest known collection of fossilized dinosaur embryos.

"In a way, I think we have set a new standard for dinosaur embryology," said paleontologist Robert Reisz, the lead study author.

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August 21st, 2012
09:24 PM ET

Apparent dinosaur track found where scientists reach for the stars

Goddard Space Flight Center scientists trying to unlock secrets of the universe have had clues to the prehistoric past resting literally beneath their feet.

Dinosaur tracker Ray Stanford this summer discovered on the center's campus the apparent footprint of a nodosaur, a plant-eater that roamed suburban Washington, D.C., about 110 million years ago.

The track, almost 14 inches wide, is near a sidewalk at the Goddard complex in Greenbelt, Maryland, home to 7,000 employees engaged in astrophysics, heliophysics and planetary science.

"It is sheer poetry," Stanford said on Tuesday. "It is because of the juxtaposition that evokes so much interest."
Stanford late last week gave NASA officials a firsthand look at the print, which was hiding in plain sight all these years.

"It's something that if you knew what you were looking for you would have seen," said Alan Binstock, in charge of cultural and archaeological matters at the facility. "That's what's so amazing."

A paleontologist will do a survey to confirm the find, Binstock said, and will help determine what areas on the fenced campus may need further protection.

"I said this is not the only one," Stanford said. "There has to be many here."
Officials are staying mum on the footprint's exact location.

Stanford, who says he has found about 1,000 dinosaur tracks over the years, said he and a Johns Hopkins University expert are convinced it is an authentic find.

The nodosaur, which hails from the Early Cretaceous period, is named for the bony nodes found on its head, shoulders and body edges.

"They were basically an armored tank with relatively short legs," said Stanford. "They had plates reminiscent of what you would see on the crocodile."

The nodosaur, perhaps 15 feet long from snout to tail, left a print of its right rear foot in thick mud.

"You see the back of the foot, what we call a heel, is lifted up," Stanford said. "It was moving as fast as one of these guys could go. I suggest it was running."

Stanford, 74, of College Park, Maryland, moved to the area in 1986, shortly after he retired in Texas from a nonprofit research group.

In 1994, he and his children found the footprint of an Iguanodon dinosaur near the College Park airport.

"I spotted this thing and I called them over," Stanford said. "I asked 'what does it look like?' In one voice, they said, 'It looks like a dinosaur track.'"

Stanford has since worked with professionals and academics. In September 2011, he co-authored a Journal of Paleontology paper on a new nodosaur species.

Stanford often has lunch with his wife, who works at Goddard.

Several years ago, while driving there, he noticed material he thought might be indicative of the Cretaceous period.
In June, after having lunch at Goddard, Stanford returned to an area where he had found the 3-inch track of a theropod.
He came upon the nodosaur track.

Goddard's Binstock gave his own description of the discovery.

"If someone said, 'What's that?' I would have said an elephant that needs a manicure."

News of the discovery has swept the Goddard campus in recent days.

"Everybody's excited about it," Binstock said. "We're all about discovering new things."

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Giant fleas sucked dinosaur blood
Scientists found these fossilized fleas from the Middle Jurassic. The one on the left is female, the other male.
February 29th, 2012
01:00 PM ET

Giant fleas sucked dinosaur blood

When feathered dinosaurs roamed the Earth, so did giant fleas that sucked their blood.

Scientists have found the fossils of these fleas in China, and published a study of them in the journal Nature. They are about 165 million years old, making them the oldest fleas ever found.

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January 4th, 2012
01:00 PM ET

Leapin’ lizards, ‘Tailbots’ and Iron Man suits

What do you get when you cross a robot with the tail of a leaping lizard? A “Tailbot.”

Research published Wednesday in the journal Nature shows how scientists at the University of California, Berkeley developed an active “tail” for a robotic car called Tailbot. When Tailbot jumps a ramp, its tail stops it from pitching forward and tumbling end-over-end to the ground.

Tailbot is just the latest step forward in the area of bio-inspired robotics, says chief researcher Bob Full, professor of integrative biology.

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Dinosaurs migrated long distances, says new study
These dinosaur tooth fossils have horizontal marks where enamel was removed for analysis by Colorado College researchers.
October 26th, 2011
01:00 PM ET

Dinosaurs migrated long distances, says new study

Like many birds and mammals today, ancient plant-eating dinosaurs migrated hundreds of miles each year as seasons changed, according to a study published online Wednesday by the journal Nature.

Scientists have long suspected that camarasaurus – a 50-foot-long, 20-ton dinosaur that lived 145 million years ago during the late Jurassic Period - migrated.

But what really surprised scientists was how far these big lizards walked: a six-month, 186-mile trek from lowlands to the mountains and then back again.

"That's a lot of  walking to do over the course of a year," said the study's lead scientist, Henry Fricke of Colorado College.

The research touches on key questions among dinosaur experts: How did these giant beasts behave, and why were they so big?

Fossilized teeth and chemicals called oxygen isotopes may have unlocked a few clues.

Fricke and his team spent four years analyzing oxygen isotopes in fossilized camarasaurus teeth found in Wyoming and Utah.

Here's a basic idea of how it worked. Water across the ancient landscape contained specific ratios of two isotopes: oxygen 18, which has eight protons and 10 neutrons in its nucleus, and oxygen 16, which has eight protons and eight neutron in its nucleus.  Researchers were able to track locations where the dinosaurs drank their water by examining the isotopes built up in the fossilized tooth enamel, like a "tiny tape recorder of what animals were drinking," Fricke said. From this data, scientists tracked the dinosaurs from lowlands in what is now Wyoming and Utah to mountainous regions to the west.
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Which rock killed the dinosaurs? The plot thickens
Scientists blame huge clashing asteroids for wiping out Earth's dinosaurs 65 million years ago.
September 20th, 2011
10:20 AM ET

Which rock killed the dinosaurs? The plot thickens

(CNN) - A 65-million-year-old murder mystery just got a bit more mysterious.

Which "family" of asteroids killed earth's dinosaurs?

New data from NASA's orbiting Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) throws doubt on a 2007 theory that blamed the death of the dinosaurs on fragments from an asteroid family called Baptistina, located between Mars and Jupiter.

Baptistina was a huge asteroid which crashed into another space rock millions of years ago, sending mountain-sized pieces flying in various directions.

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Amber reveals dinosaur, bird feathers
These 16 clumped feather barbs were found encased in amber in Canada.
September 16th, 2011
12:56 PM ET

Amber reveals dinosaur, bird feathers

We don't know exactly what dinosaurs looked like, but feathers discovered in 80-million-year-old amber provide new clues.

Paleontologists made this discovery of feather specimens near Grassy Lake in southwestern Alberta, Canada, and described the results in the journal Science.

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